Legalized cannabis linked to fewer synthetic cannabinoid poisonings

Synthetic cannabinoids, dangerous designer drugs known by such street names as K2, Spice or AK-47, appear to have less appeal in states that have legalized the natural form of cannabis.

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Researchers identify new target for therapies to treat preterm labor

Researchers have identified a cause of preterm labor, an enigma that has long challenged researchers. New research published in The Journal of Physiology suggests that a protein called Piezo1 is responsible for regulating the behavior of the uterus. Piezo1 keeps the uterus relaxed, ensuring that it continues to stretch and expand during the 40 weeks it takes a fetus to grow.

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Aldosterone linked to increased risk of chronic kidney disease progression and end-stage kidney disease

A steroid hormone called aldosterone is linked to an increased risk of kidney failure in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a study published in the European Heart Journal today. The risk of CKD worsening and developing into end-stage kidney disease was independent of whether or not patients had diabetes.

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Tackling suicide risk in people with mental disorders

Clinical researchers from Oxford University's Department of Psychiatry and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, together with colleagues from elsewhere, have developed guidance to help clinicians identify and treat patients at risk of suicide.

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Synthetic 'forever chemical' linked to liver cancer

Exposure to a synthetic chemical found widely in the environment is linked to non-viral hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer, according to a new study conducted by researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC and published in JHEP Reports.

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Eating grapes could hold remarkable potential for health benefits

Recent studies released by Dr. John Pezzuto and his team from Western New England University show "astonishing" effects of grape consumption and "remarkable" impacts on health and on lifespans.

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Seven things to know about polio

New York state health officials warned last week that hundreds of people may have been infected with the polio virus, based on recent wastewater testing in different counties within New York state.

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Reinfection rates low after successful HCV treatment in people who inject drugs

A cohort study found that reinfection rates are low after successful hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment in people who inject drugs (PWID), suggesting a benefit of treatment in this population. Risk for reinfection was highest in the first 24 weeks after treatment completion and among people with ongoing injecting drug use, and especially among those who shared needles. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Circadian clocks play a key role in fat cell growth

Disruption of the circadian clocks that keep the body and its cells entrained to the 24-hour day-night cycle plays a critical role in weight gain, according to a pair of studies by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators.

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Exercise training program improves cardiorespiratory fitness in adults with chronic kidney disease

A randomized trial recently published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD) found that a 12-month program of in-center aerobic and resistance exercise program improved physical functioning among adults 55 years and older with CKD stages G3b-4 and a high level of medical comorbidities.

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Researchers develop a small molecule that could make immunotherapy available to all cancer patients

Researchers at Tel Aviv University and the University of Lisbon have jointly identified and synthesized a small molecule that could be a more accessible and effective alternative to an antibody that is successfully used to treat a range of cancers. Behind the groundbreaking development is an international team of researchers led by Prof. Ronit Sachi-Fainaro, Head of the Center for Cancer Biology Research and Head of the Laboratory for Cancer Research and Nanomedicine at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, and Prof. Helena Florindo and Prof. Rita Guedes from the Research Institute for Medicines at the Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon. The results of the study were published in the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer.

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Cells are able to 'talk to themselves' for better immune response

Research from the laboratories of Dr. André Veillette, Director of Research in Molecular Oncology at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) and Professor and Researcher in the Department of Medicine at the Université de Montréal, and Dr. Romain Roncagalli, immunology researcher at the Marseille-Luminy Immunology Center, just published in the journal Science Immunology, sheds new light on the ability of cells to contribute more effectively to the body's immune response through internal communication.

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Researchers study schizophrenia by emulating it in a petri dish

It was one of those coveted moments of serendipity in a scientific career.

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Risk of death rises as climate change causes nighttime temperatures to climb

Excessively hot nights caused by climate change are predicted to increase the mortality rate around the world by up to 60% by the end of the century, according to a new international study that features research from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

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Prevalence of gender-diverse youth in rural Appalachia exceeds previous estimates, study shows

Gender-diverse youth are at an increased risk of suicide and depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the prevalence of gender diversity is largely unknown—especially in rural areas, where studies of the topic are rare.

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New injectable gel offers promise for tough-to-treat brain tumors

Like the hardiest weed, glioblastoma almost always springs back—usually within months after a patient's initial brain tumor is surgically removed. That is why survival rates for this cancer are just 25 percent at one year and plummet to 5 percent by the five-year mark.

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Higher doses of CAR-T therapy bring survival advantage for young patients with hard-to-treat B-ALL

Young people who received doses of tisagenlecleucel, a chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy, at the higher end of the FDA-approved dosing range had significantly better survival rates at one year compared with those who received lower doses within this range, according to research published today in Blood Advances.

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Cystic fibrosis: Causal treatment suitable from childhood

Cystic fibrosis remains an incurable genetic disorder that impairs lung function and significantly reduces life expectancy. A new combination drug therapy that addresses the disorder's underlying defects offers a promising new treatment approach. The use of this therapy had previously been limited to adolescents and adults. Designed to meet the highest standards of clinical practice, a study co-led by Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin has now confirmed that this combination therapy regimen is also beneficial to primary school-aged children. Earlier treatment means disease progression is likely to be significantly slowed. The researchers' findings have been published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Scientists identify novel molecular biomarkers in cells that spread a deadly form of breast cancer

Studying a deadly type of breast cancer called triple negative, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have identified key molecular differences between cancer cells that cling to an initial tumor and those that venture off to form distant tumors.

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Greater empathy in adolescents helps prevent bias-based cyberbullying

Bullying has been made easier and sometimes more serious by social media, gaming platforms, and other online communications technologies, affecting so many of our schools, families and communities. Research is also clear that cyberbullying—the online variant of school-based bullying—is linked to a host of negative emotional, psychological, physiological and behavioral outcomes.

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Why do men face a higher risk of most types of cancer than women?

Rates of most types of cancer are higher in men than in women for reasons that are unclear. Results from a recent study published in Cancer suggest that the cause may be underlying biological sex differences rather than behavioral differences related to smoking, alcohol use, diet, and other factors.

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COVID-19 lockdown may have increased suicidal thoughts

The lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic had a significant effect on levels of suicidal ideation, a new study finds. The research, published in Open Medicine, was conducted in a Serbian psychiatric clinic shortly after a nationwide lockdown.

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Study connects climate hazards to 58% of infectious diseases

Climate hazards such as flooding, heat waves and drought have worsened more than half of the hundreds of known infectious diseases in people, including malaria, hantavirus, cholera and anthrax, a study says.

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Update on acute liver inflammation of unknown origin in children

Unexplained cases of acute liver inflammation in children, especially in the United Kingdom (U.K.), were reported earlier this year. In response, the European Reference Network on Hepatological Diseases (ERN RARE-LIVER) conducted a thorough investigation that did not confirm the alarming observation from the U.K. in other European countries. However, an infectious cause remains the main suspected culprit in this outbreak. Published in Eurosurveillance, the most recent data suggest a co-infection of adenovirus with an adeno-associated virus.

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Identification of effective combination therapies for COVID-19 that may reduce the formation of novel variants

COVID-19 is anticipated to keep causing regular outbreak waves for the foreseeable future. The recent COVID-19 waves have caused fewer hospitalizations and deaths than the initial ones, which is largely due to the immunity provided by vaccines. However, many people have defects in their immune systems and cannot effectively protect themselves from COVID-19 by vaccination. Such individuals depend on effective antiviral therapies when they are infected.

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Many people don't know basic facts about monkeypox, making them susceptible to conspiracy theories

Did evil scientists intentionally release monkeypox?

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Brain-robot therapy reroutes motor pathway in stroke patients

Brain-robot interfaces—apparatuses where brain activity controls the movements of a robotic device that supports a hand or limb—show promise in rehabilitating paralyzed stroke patients. Yet the exact way the therapy impacts the brain is unknown, making it difficult to test and refine the technology. New research published in JNeurosci indicates the interfaces might work by helping the brain reroute motor commands around damaged areas.

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Do wildfires put Californians at higher risk for lung cancer?

In California and across the country, more people are likely to die from lung cancer than any other cancer, the American Lung Association states in an August press release, as wildfire season is in full swing.

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Ask the Pediatrician: What should parents know about SIDS and how to prevent it?

Q: I've been reading about SIDS and wonder if some babies are at greater risk for it? How do I prevent it?

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Skin cancer cells harness nerve cell gene to drill through and invade new tissues

Melanoma skin cancer cells harness a gene usually used by growing nerves to escape from their immediate area and spread through tissues, new research has found.

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