Beijing extends work-from-home order as COVID-19 cases rise

Beijing extended orders for workers and students to stay home and ordered additional mass testing Monday as cases of COVID-19 again rose in the Chinese capital.

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WHO chief: The COVID pandemic is 'most certainly not over'

The COVID-19 pandemic is "most certainly not over," the head of the World Health Organization warned Sunday, despite a decline in reported cases since the peak of the omicron wave. He told governments that "we lower our guard at our peril."

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US flight brings tons of needed baby formula from Germany

A US military plane bringing several tons of much-needed baby formula from Germany landed Sunday at an airport in Indiana as authorities scramble to address a critical shortage.

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Theories emerge for mysterious liver illnesses in children

Health officials remain perplexed by mysterious cases of severe liver damage in hundreds of young children around the world.

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National Poll: Safety not always top of mind for parents choosing kids' summer camps

When it comes to picking a summer camp for kids, logistics top the checklist for most parents, a new national poll suggests.

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Liver transplants from drug overdose deaths rose sharply during COVID-19 pandemic

Liver transplants from drug overdose donors rose significantly in the pandemic's first year, helping keep the number of liver transplants in the U.S. stable despite COVID-19 disruptions, according to a study to be presented at Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2022.

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It's 'Kids to parks day': get out, get active

It's a good idea to get children outside every day, but especially on Kids to Parks Day, a national day of outdoor play on May 21.

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US sees risk of COVID supply rationing without more funds

The White House is planning for "dire" contingencies that could include rationing supplies of vaccines and treatments this fall if Congress doesn't approve more money for fighting COVID-19.

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Spain eases Covid entry for unvaccinated tourists

Spain on Saturday eased Covid entry rules for unvaccinated tourists from outside the European Union, in a boost for the key tourism sector ahead of the peak summer holidays.

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Cannabis users require more sedation for endoscopy

Patients who use cannabis required higher levels of sedation during gastric endoscopies than non-users, according to research to be presented at Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2022. As cannabis is legalized in more places and usage rises, clinicians should be aware of patients' habits and prepare themselves and their patients for increased sedation and accompanying risks, researchers said.

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Regulatory, patent reform needed for inhalers for asthma, COPD

Of the 62 inhalers approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration since 1986, few have offered novel drug innovations, according to a study published online May 17 in Health Affairs.

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Mounjaro approved for blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes

Mounjaro (tirzepatide) injection was approved as an addition to diet and exercise to improve blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced May 13.

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Europe health official warns monkeypox cases could 'accelerate'

A top European health official warned Friday that cases of the rare monkeypox virus could accelerate in the coming months, as the virus spread across Europe.

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Thousands of Covid-negative Beijing residents sent to quarantine

Thousands of Covid-negative Beijing residents were relocated to quarantine hotels overnight due to a handful of infections, as the capital begins to take more extreme control measures resembling virus-hit Shanghai.

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Research sheds light on crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever disease process

Army scientists determined that the body's own natural immune response contributes to disease severity in mice infected with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), which causes a widespread tick-borne viral infection in humans. Their work, published May 19, 2022 in PLoS Pathogens, provides a deeper understanding of how the virus causes disease and forms a basis for developing medical countermeasures to prevent and treat infection.

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A pioneering study discovers an underlying cause for infantile spasms and points to a novel therapy

Infantile spasm (IS) is a severe epileptic syndrome of infancy and accounts for 50% of all epilepsy cases that occur in babies during the first year of life. Current treatment options for this disorder are limited and most affected infants grow up to have developmental delays, intellectual disabilities and other types of severe epilepsy. A groundbreaking study, conducted in the laboratory of Dr. John Swann, director of the Gordon and Mary Cain Pediatric Neurology Research Foundation labs, investigator at the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital and professor at Baylor College of Medicine, has found that the levels of insulin growth factor -1 (IGF-1) and its downstream signaling are reduced in the brains of both IS patients and animal models. Furthermore, they found that the administration of an IGF-1 analog to an IS animal model successfully eliminated spasms and abnormal brain activity. This exciting study, published in the Annals of Neurology, has the potential to transform the treatment landscape for babies with infantile spasms.

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Resolution time of COVID vaccine-related lymphadenopathy

According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), axillary lymphadenopathy detected by breast ultrasound after COVID-19 mRNA vaccination lasts longer than reported in initial vaccine clinical trials.

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Haywire T cells attack protein in "bad" cholesterol

Preventing atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart disease, means scientists need to understand how immune cells drive inflammation in the arteries.

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New clues in fight against lethal bacteria

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) could lead to better treatment options for a rare but very lethal type of bacterial infection. 

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New research challenges established ideas about infant crying

When will my infant child stop crying so much?

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Study shows that VEGF-A can increase expression of dopamine D2 receptors on endothelial cells

Researchers have identified a new molecular drug target that could result in new cancer drugs with fewer side effects.

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Study: App more accurate than patient evaluation of stool samples

An innovative mobile phone application was found to be as good as expert gastroenterologists at characterizing stool specimens, according to a study by Cedars-Sinai. The artificial intelligence (AI) used in the smartphone app also outperformed reports by patients describing their stool specimens.

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Scientists gain ground on rare congenital neurological disorder

Two recent discoveries co-led by scientists at Cedars-Sinai may help lead to new ways to treat patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS), a brain development disorder that causes severe intellectual disability and problems with movement.   

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New research shows no evidence of structural brain change with short-term mindfulness training

In the mid-20th century, new evidence showed that the brain could be "plastic," and that experience could create changes in the brain. Plasticity has been linked to learning new skills, including spatial navigation, aerobic exercise and balance training.

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Risk factors identified for autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplant

A multicenter study performed by a large international consortium that includes UT Southwestern has outlined a set of risk factors and outcomes for patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) that recurs after liver transplantation. The findings, published in the Journal of Hepatology, represent a first step toward better managing and potentially preventing this uncommon condition.

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Children who play adventurously have better mental health, research finds

Children who spend more time playing adventurously have lower symptoms of anxiety and depression, and were happier over the first COVID-19 lockdown, according to new research.

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Research brings hope for spinal cord injury treatment

Scientists from the University of Birmingham have shown an existing drug may reduce damage after spinal cord injury, by blocking the inflammatory response in the spinal cord.

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Medicinal cannabis shown to reduce pain and need for opiate painkillers among cancer patients

A comprehensive assessment of the benefits of medical cannabis for cancer-related pain found that for most oncology patients, pain measures improved significantly, other cancer-related symptoms also decreased, the consumption of painkillers was reduced, and the side effects were minimal. Published in Frontiers in Pain Research, these findings suggest that medicinal cannabis can be carefully considered as an alternative to the pain relief medicines that are usually prescribed to cancer patients.

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Watch and wait strategy could be better than emergency surgery for patients with severe levels of frailty

New research published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anesthetists) shows that for patients who are very frail, it may be better to adopt a "watch and wait" approach rather than proceeding to emergency surgery for five common medical emergencies. The study suggests this would actually improve outcomes, says Professor Richard Grieve of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

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Mayo Clinic Q and A: Irritable bowel syndrome and lifestyle modifications

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have been diagnosed with a mild case of irritable bowel syndrome, and I talked to my doctor about managing my symptoms without medication. I am interested in trying to focus more on diet to control my condition. Are there certain things that I should be mindful of, or will medication be the only way for me to manage my symptoms?

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