5 signs of depression you shouldn't ignore

It can be painful to watch a friend struggle with their mental health. Here are some common symptoms of depression to watch for and ways to support a friend or loved one who is struggling.

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Will we be able to count abortions after the Dobbs decision?

For over 50 years, most legal, clinically overseen abortions in the United States were counted.

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The costs of caring for a graying population

With the "graying population" phenomenon becoming widespread, many countries are facing the challenge of caring for their elderly population. In Japan, the country with the oldest population, a universal long-term care (LTC) insurance system was established in 2000 to help meet this need. Now, in a study published in BMC Public Health, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed the considerable variation between Japan's municipalities in spending on LTC.

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Five things to do in your 20s and 30s to reduce your risk of preventable cancer

Most of us don't think about cancer when we're in our 20s and 30s. But recent research has shown that people born after 1990 are more likely to develop cancer before the age of 50 than any other generation before.

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60% aren't being screened for diabetes complications in South Africa, according to new study

The world is experiencing a steep rise in the number of people living with diabetes, a chronic condition of significant public health concern. Many developing countries like South Africa now bear the greatest burden.

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How climate change is likely to worsen reproductive health for generations

Think beyond the infant in your arms. That's the call to action a University at Buffalo epidemiologist is stressing in a new line of research investigating the long-term effects climate change is likely to have on birthing parents and future generations.

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Anti-vaccine efforts in Texas Legislature—successful or not—set dangerous tone, says expert

Anti-vaccine legislation in Texas—even when it doesn't become law—poses a threat to public health, according to a report from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

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Syria reports 39 dead in cholera outbreak

Syria's health ministry has recorded 39 deaths from cholera and nearly 600 cases in an outbreak spreading in the war-ravaged country that the United Nations warned is "evolving alarmingly".

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Health worker burnout and 'compassion fatigue' put patients at risk

The toll of COVID on our health care workers has been brutal, with many saying they want to quit their jobs.

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Particle radioactivity linked to pollution-associated heart attack and stroke death

Particle radioactivity, a characteristic of air pollution that reflects the colorless, odorless gas radon found in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution, enhances PM2.5 toxicity and increases risk of death from cardiovascular disease, especially from heart attack or stroke, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Parenting practices in teen years set the stage for closeness, warmth later on

High-quality parenting practices in adolescence lay the foundation for close parent-child relationships when the children become young adults, according to new research from Penn State.

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Putting the brakes on heroin relapse

Neuroscientists from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) report in Science Advances that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes can "turn off" neurons involved in relapse to heroin. Drug-related cues in the environment can intensify the drive to seek drugs, leading to relapse. In this article, a team led by Peter Kalivas, Ph.D., and Anna Kruyer, Ph.D., both of the Department of Neuroscience, examined how astrocytes interact with neurons and whether astrocytes play an important role in regulating the response to drug cues.

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Do attitudes and behaviors in response to stress impact the health of older people with diabetes?

New research published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society suggests that psychological resilience—having attitudes and behaviors that help people bounce back after stressful challenges—may help older individuals with type 2 diabetes have fewer hospitalizations, better physical functioning, lower disability, better mental quality of life, and a lower likelihood of becoming frail.

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Can paid parental leave help prevent newborn deaths?

A recent analysis published in Contemporary Economic Policy indicates that 6-week paid family leave in California saved 339 infants' lives from 2004–2008.

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Can excessive physical activity during adolescence lead to problems with leg alignment?

A study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research used imaging tests to reveal that physical activity levels may impact adolescents' and young adults' leg alignment during development.

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Uganda health worker dies of Ebola, raising toll to 10

Uganda on Wednesday confirmed the death of a health worker from Ebola, bringing the total number of fatalities from the highly contagious virus to 10.

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Hospital readmission rate for younger women is higher than for younger men after a heart attack

In a new study of younger heart attack victims in Ontario, Canada, researchers found that the health care system delivers high quality care for younger heart attack survivors; however, there are still disparities between men and women. Cardiovascular and all-cause hospital readmission rates are higher in young women than young men. This underscores the need for ongoing efforts to improve prevention strategies, as risk factors for heart disease in young women continue to rise. Their findings appear in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

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New study reveals possible brain mechanisms behind COVID-19 delirium

Researchers from King's College London have shown that when brain cells are directly exposed to blood taken from COVID-19 patients with delirium, there is an increase in cell death and a decrease in the generation of new brain cells. Delirium represents a state of confusion indicating that, in these patients, the COVID-19 infection had impacted the brain.

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There is no quick fix for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among UK South Asian communities, find researchers

The complex, multiple factors influencing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and skepticism among UK South Asian communities mean "quick fix" solutions to increase uptake of the vaccines will be ineffective, according to new research published by JRSM Open.

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Eliminating sexual violence could reduce poor mental health among teens

The prevalence of serious mental health problems among 17-year-olds could drop by as much as 16.8% for girls and 8.4% for boys if they were not subjected to sexual violence, such as sexual assault and harassment, according to estimates from UCL researchers.

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Transgender women's heart-lung capacity and strength exceed those of cisgender peers even after years of hormone therapy

The heart and lung capacity and strength of transgender women exceed those of their cisgender peers, even after years of female hormone therapy, but they are lower than those of cisgender men, indicates the first study of its kind, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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AI-enabled imaging of retina's vascular network can predict cardiovascular disease and death

AI-enabled imaging of the retina's network of veins and arteries can accurately predict cardiovascular disease and death, without the need for blood tests or blood pressure measurement, finds research published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Neurodegenerative disease risk is found to be more than double among former Scottish international rugby union players

The risk of neurodegenerative disease among former Scottish international rugby union players is more than double that of the general population, finds research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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The big bounce-back: Survey captures post-pandemic rebound in Utah's community well-being

When Courtney Flint launched the Utah Wellbeing Project, her timing couldn't have been more serendipitous. A global pandemic would soon disrupt many aspects of daily life in Utah—from school schedules to global supply chains to access to toilet paper. But in early 2020, Utahns were still going about maskless, working in offices, shaking hands, and going about their day-to-day routines with air-sharing ignorance of what was to come.

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Combination of poor gait and weak hand grip could be early indicators of dementia

Walking speed and grip strength could be early indicators of dementia before the onset of noticeable symptoms, a Monash University study reveals.

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Orthopedic surgery patients do fine without opioid painkillers, according to new study

Patients can recover from orthopedic surgery just as well without using opioid-based painkillers, says a McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

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Researchers highlight critical role of Ontario's primary care providers during pandemic

Primary care providers have a critical role to play in the pandemic—and improving access to that care is key, say researchers from the Ontario COVID-19 Science Advisory Table.

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Infections reported after single dose of monkeypox vaccine

Most cases of monkeypox that occur after vaccination with the modified Vaccinia Ankara-Bavarian Nordic vaccine (MVA-BN) occur within 14 days of receipt of the first dose, according to a research letter published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Researchers advance efforts to develop protein-based treatment therapy for individuals with ALS

Researchers at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, located at the University of South Florida, successfully tested a protein that has the potential to aid in the development of a protein-based therapy for patients with ALS, a progressive nervous system disease, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

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Topical antibiotics shorten duration of conjunctival symptoms

For children with acute infective conjunctivitis, topical antibiotics are associated with a shorter duration of conjunctival symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in JAMA Network Open.

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