Iceland reimposes COVID restrictions after cases surge

Iceland, one of the first nations in the world to lift all COVID restrictions for vaccinated tourists, on Friday announced new curbs following a spate of infections.

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Covid cases surpass 40 million in Latin America and the Caribbean

The number of COVID-19 cases surpassed 40 million on Saturday in Latin America and the Caribbean.

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China closing county near Myanmar for mass virus testing

Everyone in a county in China's southwest near Myanmar will be tested for the coronavirus following a spike in infections, the government announced Saturday.

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Vietnam locks down capital Hanoi for 15 days as cases rise

Vietnam announced a 15-day lockdown in the capital Hanoi starting Saturday as a coronavirus surge spread from the southern Mekong Delta region.

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UN adopts first resolution on vision, aims to help 1 billion

The U.N. General Assembly approved its first-ever resolution on vision Friday, calling on its 193 member nations to ensure access to eye care for everyone in their countries which would contribute to a global effort to help at least 1.1 billion people with vision impairment who currently lack eye services by 2030.

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Florida COVID-19 hospitalizations jump significantly again

Florida's COVID-19 hospitalizations and cases again jumped significantly this week as the vaccination rate in rural counties where some of the worst outbreaks are occurring remains well below the state and national averages.

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Do vaccinated people need to go back to masking?

With the Delta variant pushing US COVID cases back up, fully vaccinated people are wondering whether they need to start masking indoors again.

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Comprehensive clinical sequencing opens door to the promise of precision medicine

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have demonstrated that comprehensive genomic sequencing of all pediatric cancer patients is feasible and essential to capitalize on the lifesaving potential of precision medicine. Results from the St. Jude Genomes for Kids study appear online today in the journal Cancer Discovery.

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Using silicone wristbands to measure air quality

A study by researchers at the Texas A&M University School of Public Health shows that inexpensive and convenient devices such as silicone wristbands can be used to yield quantitative air quality data, which is particularly appealing for periods of susceptibility such as pregnancy.

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Neuroscientists posit that brain region is a key locus of learning

Small and seemingly specialized, the brain's locus coeruleus (LC) region has been stereotyped for its outsized export of the arousal-stimulating neuromodulator norepinephrine. In a new paper and with a new grant from the National Institutes of Health, an MIT neuroscience lab is making the case that the LC is not just an alarm button but has a more nuanced and multifaceted impact on learning, behavior and mental health than it has been given credit for.

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New understanding of cell stability with potential to improve immune cell therapies

Research in mice, published today in Science Immunology by researchers at the Babraham Institute, UK and VIB-KU Leuven, Belgium, provides two solutions with potential to overcome a key clinical limitation of immune cell therapies. Regulatory T cells have potential in treating autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases yet they can switch from a protective to damaging function. By identifying the unstable regulatory T cells, and understanding how they can be purged from a cell population, the authors highlight a path forward for regulatory T cell transfer therapy.

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As cases soar, Spaniards keep their masks firmly on

It's over 35 degrees Celsius and although masks are no longer obligatory in the streets of Spain, masks are everywhere in Madrid as people fear soaring Covid cases.

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AP-NORC poll: Most unvaccinated Americans don't want shots

Most Americans who haven't been vaccinated against COVID-19 say they are unlikely to get the shots and doubt they would work against the aggressive delta variant despite evidence they do, according to a new poll that underscores the challenges facing public health officials amid soaring infections in some states.

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Risk factors ID'd for VTE, ASCVD in rheumatoid arthritis patients

(HealthDay)—For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are common risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), and the risk for ASCVD is increased after unprovoked VTE, according to a study recently published in RMD Open.

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Primary care plays key role in vaccinating older individuals

(HealthDay)—Primary care physicians have been the largest provider of vaccinations for older individuals, according to a study published online in the July 1 issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Better healthcare management can reduce the risk of delirium among older adults

Elderly patients with neurological conditions are significantly more likely to develop delirium shortly after they are hospitalized.

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Why do some people get severe COVID-19? The nose may know

The body's first encounter with SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, happens in the nose and throat, or nasopharynx. A new study in the journal Cell suggests that the first responses in this battleground help determine who will develop severe disease and who will get through with mild or no illness.

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What's riskier for young soccer players, practice or game time?

For young soccer players, participating in repetitive technical training activities involving heading during practice may result in more total head impacts but playing in scrimmages or actual soccer games may result in greater magnitude head impacts. That's according to a small, preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference, July 30-31, 2021.

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Carboplatin intensification shown beneficial for group 3 medulloblastoma

(HealthDay)—For children with high-risk group 3 medulloblastoma, therapy intensification with carboplatin improves event-free survival, according to a study published online July 22 in JAMA Oncology.

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Links between genetic risk, glaucoma prevalence examined

(HealthDay)—Polygenic variants are associated with comparable risk for developing open-angle glaucoma as that associated with the most common single-gene pathogenic variant, according to a study published online July 15 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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We're losing the vaccination race because of bungling, not bad luck

As one big international competition begins, another one is nearing its end. At least we hope so.

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Postnatal depression impact on digital behaviors and lack of resources for new dads

New parents often find themselves with negative self-image and feel alienated from support networks, new research has found.

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Women are more likely than men to develop more-deadly right-sided colon cancer

The traditional broad categories of cancer are splintering into finer subcategories as researchers unravel the incredible complexity and variety within locational descriptors such as "breast cancer" or "lung cancer." For instance, we now know that the general term "breast cancer" encompasses a range of heterogeneous tumors with different genetics, mechanisms, and drivers requiring different targeted therapies.

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COVID vaccine weekly: Reopening will test the strength of England's immunity

England has now lifted nearly all of its coronavirus restrictions. Cases are high and rising, but the country's vaccine coverage is among the best the world, meaning that the power of vaccines to control the virus will now be firmly put to the test. How will this battle play out?

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'Feel good' brain messenger can be willfully controlled, new study reveals

From the thrill of hearing an ice cream truck approaching to the spikes of pleasure while sipping a fine wine, the neurological messenger known as dopamine has been popularly described as the brain's "feel good" chemical related to reward and pleasure.

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US clinics slower to provide opioid treatment than Canadian clinics

As opioid overdose deaths rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, people seeking treatment for opioid addiction had to wait nearly twice as long to begin methadone treatment in the United States than in Canada, a new Yale study has shown.

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Four themes identified as contributors to diseases of despair in Pennsylvania

Financial instability, lack of infrastructure, a deteriorating sense of community and family fragmentation are key contributors to diseases of despair in Pennsylvania communities, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Highmark Health researchers. The researchers conducted four focus groups in Pennsylvania communities identified as having high rates of despair-related illnesses.

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US orders 200 mn more Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine doses

The United States will purchase 200 million more COVID-19 vaccine doses from Pfizer and BioNTech and has an option to buy additional doses to address virus variants, the companies announced Friday.

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Americans with higher net worth at midlife tend to live longer

One of the keys to a long life may lie in your net worth.

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Study: COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and ways to reduce it

A new study co-authored by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School identified behavioral patterns associated with reluctance among some adults for receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.

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