US plans end to mpox public health emergency in January

The federal government plans to end in January the public health emergency it declared earlier this year after an outbreak of mpox infected more than 29,000 people across the U.S.

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Flu season worsens as 44 states report high activity

The U.S. flu season keeps getting worse.

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Accelerating pathogen identification in infants and children with bloodstream infections

A collaborative team led by researchers from Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (GOSH), London and including researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and BOA Biomedical in Cambridge has re-engineered the process of microbial pathogen identification in blood samples from pediatric sepsis patients using the Wyss Institute's FcMBL broad-spectrum pathogen capture technology. The advance enables accurate pathogen detection with a combination of unprecedented sensitivity and speed, and could significantly improve clinical outcomes for pediatric and older patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs) and sepsis. The findings were published in PLoS ONE.

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Social media found to contribute to increase in cosmetic procedures

Influencers on social media have contributed to an uptake of people using cosmetic procedures to enhance their appearance, research suggests.

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UK officials warn over Strep infections after child deaths

UK health officials on Friday warned parents to be alert for scarlet fever symptoms in their children, following the death of six youngsters from a more serious Group A strep-related illness.

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New position statement explicitly supports family, career ambitions

The Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS), a scientific and educational association with more than 1,000 members dedicated to advancing the specialty of neurointerventional surgery, has made a statement in support of pregnancy and parental leave policies for those in the field who are birthing or non-birthing parents including those who adopt, foster, and the like.

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New research explores options for motherhood in lung cancer patients

New research from the University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center highlights the need for additional data collection for women hoping to have successful pregnancies while undergoing treatment for lung cancer. Specifically, they focus on the diagnosis of advanced oncogene-driven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that disproportionately affects women of reproductive age.

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Postpartum visits declined during COVID-19, especially among Black, young and uninsured women

A new study by researchers at Brown University showed that the pandemic further restricted access to postpartum care, potentially exacerbating existing health care disparities.

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Good social relations promote active and healthy aging in Europe, finds researcher

In the older European population, men, as well as those with lower socioeconomic status, weak social ties, and poor health, might experience more difficulties getting informal support and are considered to have a higher risk of worsening frailty state and lower quality of life. This reality is shown in a new doctoral thesis at Umeå university.

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Prostate cancer: Getting ever closer to diagnosis using an 'electronic nose'

The diagnosis of prostate cancer using a non-invasive method and with greater accuracy than traditional diagnostic procedures is ever closer to becoming a reality.

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Short term memory problems can be improved with laser therapy, according to new study

Laser light therapy has been shown to be effective in improving short term memory in a study published in Science Advances.

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New study suggests tabletop games reduce stress and anxiety

In this first-of-its-kind research project, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology partnered with The Bodhana Group to run an exploratory study on whether intentionally introduced cognitive behavioral therapy, delivered through the medium of Tabletop Role Playing Game (TTRPG) groups, could positively affect social skills, reduce anxiety symptoms and behaviors, and enhance the mental well-being of participants.

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Researchers identify potential mechanism underlying stress-induced different changes of amygdala neurons in mice

Chronic stress can differentially change the neuronal structure and function in the brain, leading to anxiety disorders and other neuropsychiatric illness. Now, researchers may understand how the different change occurs.

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Binge-eating disorder is more common than many realize, yet it's rarely discussed—here's what you need to know

Television personality, author and hair stylist Jonathan Van Ness recently shared on social media his struggles with his eating and weight after "years of feeling out of control with food." He described suffering from binge-eating disorder—an eating disorder characterized by consuming large amounts of food with a sense of feeling out of control.

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Scientists develop 12-hour method to predict diabetes onset in patients using artificial intelligence

Scientists at Klick Applied Sciences have discovered a way to transform a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) into a powerful diabetes screening and prevention tool using artificial intelligence.

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WHO estimates 90% have some resistance to Covid

The WHO estimated Friday that 90 percent of the world population now had some resistance to Covid-19, but warned that a troubling new variant could still emerge.

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Re-examining antibodies' role in childhood allergies

The presence of food-specific IgA antibodies in the gut does not prevent peanut or egg allergies from developing in children, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in Science Translational Medicine.

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Report: Australia now spends more on mental health and substance use disorders than on injuries

Between 2018–19 and 2019–20, spending on mental and substance use disorders grew to replace injuries as the fourth highest category of health spending.

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Overuse of in-hospital blood pressure medications

Patients in hospital for non-heart related conditions may be unnecessarily receiving blood pressure medication that has no benefit and could instead be harmful in the short term, a new review has found.

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Black Panther 2: Why the death of someone young can be harder to handle

The Marvel Studios' film "Black Panther: Wakanda Forever" addresses themes of grief and the injustice of dying young, connected to the death of the lead actor, Chadwick Boseman, in 2020. Boseman died from colorectal cancer at the age of 43, throwing the original trajectory of his character's script off the rails, forcing Marvel to revise the film's plot.

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Experimental Alzheimer's drug shows promise, but there are many hurdles still to overcome

The first drug that can slow the rate of decline in Alzheimer's patients has been found. The experimental drug, called lecanemab, is an antibody that targets the toxic clumps of amyloid protein associated with the mind-robbing disease. While these results are cause for celebration, there are still significant questions about its safety and rollout.

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Mini bio-devices could help TB patients stick to their treatments

Imagine the scenario: you've been told you have a disease that will kill you. But, the doctor adds, your life can be saved if you diligently take your medication. Don't skip a day, don't skip a dosage. Soon, however, you discover that the medication has a slew of side effects, including a loss of appetite, fatigue, and nausea. So you do stop.

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Helpful guidelines if you test positive or negative for COVID-19 test

Have you recently taken a COVID-19 test? If you're waiting for your COVID-19 test results, Mayo Clinic COVID-19 diagnostic experts have some helpful guidelines to walk you through the process.

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Pregnant moms' stress may accelerate cell aging of white, not Black, kids

Does stress during pregnancy impact children's cell aging, and does race matter? The answer is yes, according to a new UC San Francisco study published Dec. 2 in Psychological Medicine.

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Study: New tool twice as accurate at predicting antibody resistance among US children with Kawasaki disease

A new tool under development by University at Buffalo researchers could one day help clinicians better predict resistance to immunoglobulin therapy among children with Kawasaki disease in the United States.

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Immune system irregularities found in women with postpartum mood disorders

Women with prolonged mental health problems up to three years after childbirth may be suffering from irregular immune system responses, according to new research by Cedars-Sinai investigators. The findings are published in the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology.

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On Nutrition: The benefits of bones

My husband did an excellent job carving our Thanksgiving turkey. So well, in fact, that very little was left on the bones that I typically use for making turkey soup. After simmering them overnight, however, I was surprised that the almost bare bones still gave up a fair amount of meat.

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Racial disparities in lung cancer start with research

During a routine visit to the Good Samaritan Clinic in Morganton, North Carolina, in 2018, Herbert Buff casually mentioned that he sometimes had trouble breathing.

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70% of Australians living with HIV report their health-related quality of life to be good

To coincide with World AIDS Day on December 1, a major national survey of Australians living with HIV has revealed more than 70% of people living with HIV report their health-related quality of life to be good.

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Researcher identifies 6,000 sperm proteins, potentially leading to male contraceptive

A researcher has for the first time profiled 6,000 sperm proteins that could help create a non-hormonal male contraceptive—while also building on key research linking sperm health to overall men's health.

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